Bipolar disorder affects almost 5.7 million Americans or 2.3 percent of the population of the United States. This disorder generally starts in the teens or early adult years, though in some cases, not until a person is in their 40s or 50s. Many people are undiagnosed for years, and it’s also common for those with bipolar disorder to have co-occurring substance use disorder. Often, a person will try to manage the symptoms of bipolar disorder by using drugs or alcohol. This isn’t the correct approach to go about it. It’s time to seek expert assistance. Bipolar disorder and addiction treatment in Arizona can improve these conditions and your quality of life.

At Camelback Recovery, we offer several Bipolar disorder and addiction treatment in Arizona that can be customized for each patient. It’s entirely possible to lead a happy, productive, and fulfilling lifestyle while living with bipolar disorder, and at our sober living apartments in Scottsdale, we’re devoted to helping you do exactly that.

Here’s some information about bipolar disorder and how to contact us today to get started on your treatment program.

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What Is Bipolar Disorder?

Bipolar disorder is a brain disorder characterized by repeated mood swings, also called episodes. A person with bipolar disorder will cycle between very elevated moods and very low moods.

Bipolar disorder is diagnosed based on symptoms, psychiatric history, and family history. There is no blood or brain scan to test for bipolar disorder. A brain tumor, stroke, or other medical conditions that might cause a disturbance of mood need to be ruled out first.

There are several types of bipolar disorder, with the most common being Bipolar I and Bipolar II. A person diagnosed with Bipolar I will cycle between episodes of depression and mania. With Bipolar II, a person will cycle between episodes of depression and hypomania.

Mania is characterized by extreme happiness, energy and excitement, restlessness, agitation, elevated sex drive, reduced need for sleep, rapid speech, irritability, poor concentration and judgment, and paranoia. Mania may last for a week or more.

Hypomania is a milder form of mania, which generally lasts for a shorter time. The symptoms may include feeling very excited, easily distracted with racing thoughts, difficulty concentrating, irritability, agitation, and increased sex drive. A person in a hypomanic state might sleep very little, spend money excessively, talk rapidly or frequently, take risks, lose social inhibitions, and come across as extremely friendly.

The primary way to distinguish between Bipolar I and Bipolar II is that a person with Bipolar I has had emergency intervention due to their symptoms, such as a visit to the emergency department, an admission to a psychiatric hospital, or an encounter with law enforcement. In some cases, a person with Bipolar I will also experience psychosis, such as seeing or hearing things others don’t see or hear. In this case, their diagnosis is called Bipolar I with psychotic features.

If bipolar disorder is not treated, it tends to get worse. It is also very common for a person with untreated bipolar disorder to use drugs and alcohol to manage or mask the symptoms. This makes the symptoms worse while also adding to the problems caused by using and becoming an addiction to drugs and alcohol. So, it’s very vital to get treatment for bipolar disorder and any co-occurring substance use issues. When left untreated, bipolar disorder can result in severe depression and an increased risk for suicidal thoughts and behaviors.

What Is Bipolar Disorder?

Bipolar disorder is a brain disorder characterized by repeated mood swings, also called episodes. A person with bipolar disorder will cycle between very elevated moods and very low moods.

Bipolar disorder is diagnosed based on symptoms, psychiatric history, and family history. There is no blood or brain scan to test for bipolar disorder. A brain tumor, stroke, or other medical conditions that might cause a disturbance of mood need to be ruled out first.

There are several types of bipolar disorder, with the most common being Bipolar I and Bipolar II. A person diagnosed with Bipolar I will cycle between episodes of depression and mania. With Bipolar II, a person will cycle between episodes of depression and hypomania.

Mania is characterized by extreme happiness, energy and excitement, restlessness, agitation, elevated sex drive, reduced need for sleep, rapid speech, irritability, poor concentration and judgment, and paranoia. Mania may last for a week or more.

Hypomania is a milder form of mania, which generally lasts for a shorter time. The symptoms may include feeling very excited, easily distracted with racing thoughts, difficulty concentrating, irritability, agitation, and increased sex drive. A person in a hypomanic state might sleep very little, spend money excessively, talk rapidly or frequently, take risks, lose social inhibitions, and come across as extremely friendly.

The primary way to distinguish between Bipolar I and Bipolar II is that a person with Bipolar I has had emergency intervention due to their symptoms, such as a visit to the emergency department, an admission to a psychiatric hospital, or an encounter with law enforcement. In some cases, a person with Bipolar I will also experience psychosis, such as seeing or hearing things others don’t see or hear. In this case, their diagnosis is called Bipolar I with psychotic features.

If bipolar disorder is not treated, it tends to get worse. It is also very common for a person with untreated bipolar disorder to use drugs and alcohol to manage or mask the symptoms. This makes the symptoms worse while also adding to the problems caused by using and becoming an addiction to drugs and alcohol. So, it’s very vital to get treatment for bipolar disorder and any co-occurring substance use issues. When left untreated, bipolar disorder can result in severe depression and an increased risk for suicidal thoughts and behaviors.

How Is Bipolar Disorder Treated?

Once you’ve completed your journey through your dual diagnosis treatment program, you’ll need to readjust to normal life without substances. Living with a dual diagnosis of a substance abuse disorder and a co-occurring mental health disorder can cause damage to an individual’s life, resulting in lowered self-esteem that creates a higher risk of future drug abuse. Ensure long term-sobriety by forming long-lasting habits and discovering the healthy hobbies that help keep you happy without turning to substances.

Recovering from drug or alcohol addiction is the goal of many residents at our treatment centers. However, people also seek out dual diagnosis treatment programs with residential aftercare to help with co-occurring disorders such as:

  • Mental health disorders, including schizophrenia and ADHD
  • Mood disorders like bipolar disorder
  • Anxiety, OCD and post-traumatic stress disorder
  • Depression
  • Eating disorders and body dysmorphia
  • Sex addiction and codependency

How Is Bipolar Treatment Integrated Into Addiction Treatment?

At Camelback Recovery, we understand the importance of treating dual diagnoses at our sober living homes in Phoenix Arizona. All our mental health treatments can be easily integrated and included in your addiction treatment program so you can experience a fulfilling recovery from both bipolar disorder and substance use disorder.

Camelback Recovery understands that everyone is unique concerning addiction and mental health and is devoted to developing a customized treatment plan that will cater to your specific situation. We’ll do whatever it takes to ensure you’re getting the treatment you need to successfully recover from and/or manage your dual diagnosis.

Where to Find Bipolar Disorder and Addiction Treatment in Arizona

At Camelback Recovery, we offer treatment for bipolar disorder and addiction in both our partial hospitalization program (PHP rehab) and intensive outpatient program (IOP). We also operate three sober living homes for men and women who live in or near Phoenix.

Contact us today at (602) 466-9880 to learn more about our available mental health treatments, or fill out our contact form to hear back from us within one business day.